Doug & Barbara Peterson

Doug & Barbara Peterson
Barbara & I at a scenic overlook on the skyline drive in the Rocky Mountain National Park, 8-13-2016

Tuesday, June 18, 2019

Summer Trip 2019, Grand Canyon National Park, North Rim

North Rim Campground, Grand Canyon



The North Rim of the Grand Canyon is a special place which is less crowded and a bit more remote then the south rim. We stayed at the Parks campground near the North Rim Lodge. The air is a bit thin on the north rim with an average height of 8,000 feet making for comfortable temps during the day and cool nights for sleeping. The campground is booked during the summer with every spot filled which requires an advance reservation to get a spot. There are showers, laundry, fresh spring water to fill your containers, a camp store but no electric. The nights are beautiful with bright stars lighting the sky and gentle breezes through the tall pines.

Our campsite at the Grand Canyon North Rim campground
Ranger talk given at the amphitheater about Condors
The North Rim Lodge is a special place to visit with hiking trails that take you out to view points that open up to spectacular views of the canyon. Bright Angel Point is a short hike away. The sheer enormity of the canyon opens up with colorful rock formations and vistas that defy the imagination.

Bright Angel Point

View of the Grand Canyon from Bright Angel Point

Pictures can never take the place of being there, It is truly a special moment.
Sunset from the North Rim Lodge at the Grand Canyon

The North Rim Lodge at the Grand Canyon
The second day of our stay on the North Rim we took the scenic drive out to Cape Royal stopping at various view points along the way. We were blessed with great weather and views of the canyon that were rich in grandeur and majestic beauty.

Point Imperial, at 8,800 feet the highest view point in the Grand Canyon
Roosevelt Point named after Teddy Roosevelt who helped make our park system special
The beautiful canyon at the end of the Cliff Springs Trail near Cape Royal
The view of the Grand Canyon from Angel's Window

Angels Window near Cape Royal
The expansive view of the Grand Canyon from Cape Royal Point
The mighty Colorado River as seen from Cape Royal
I hope my images and narrative inspire you one day to visit the North Rim of the Grand Canyon. It is a special place like no where else on earth.


Thursday, June 13, 2019

Summer Trip 2019, Bryce Canyon National Park

Bryce Canyon National Park






Bryce Canyon National Park is a truly special place full of colorful rock formations called Hoodoos. We decided to stay in the Dixie National Forest Service campground in Red Rock Canyon. We found the campsites to be much more spacious then Bryce with great views of the canyon. We even had pay showers and flush toilets. Nether campground has electric however with our solar panel we were quit comfortable with power for our lights and electrical equipment. The best part was that we only paid $9 a night during our 5 night stay. 


Our campsite in Red Rock Canyon campground

We felt right at home with our EZ up set up next to the campfire circle

The view of the cliffs of Red Rock Canyon from our campsite

View of one of the Red Rock tunnels taken from the bike path that parallels hwy 12


We were only 11 miles from the entrance to Bryce Canyon which was extremely convenient for us giving us opportunities to visit the park early in the morning when the sun was a the right angle for great photographs of the canyon.

View us at Rainbow Point, at 9,100 feet the highest point in Bryce

Rainbow point 

Looking off into the distance from high up on Rainbow Point
The view from Bristlecone Trail at Rainbow Point

Majestic beauty surrounds you in all directions


The park has several interesting view points along a scenic drive that takes you to Rainbow Point. Each viewpoint has a unique beauty all it's own.


Aqua Canyon Overlook
Black Birch Canyon Overlook
Fairview Point Overlook
Natural Bridge Overlook
Ponderosa Point Overlook

The highlight hike for us was the Navajo Loop Trail down Wall Street. This trail connects to the Queens trailhead which ends at Sunrise Point. The views in the canyon our amazing once you get below the rim. The hoodoos are shaped into interesting formations. The most famous of all is the queen rock formation.

The Queen rock formation
Wall Street

Barbara descending into Wall Street

The narrow slot canyon at the bottom of Wall Street
Views of the Queens Trail to Sunrise Point




Barbara climbing the last portion of the trail to
Sunrise Point
Bryce Canyon National Park is a very special place that leaves every visitor with a sense of wonder and a lasting memories.



Monday, June 10, 2019

Summer Trip 2019, The Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument


During our stay visiting the Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument we camped out at Escalante Petrified Forest State Park just outside Escalante, Utah. We were lucky enough to reserve a campsite in the park adjacent to the Wide Hollow Reservoir with great views of the lake and the surrounding Mesa's. The campground has great showers, restrooms and most important of us electric after five days of dry camping. We made our reservations before our tip as this park is quite popular and has just 22 sites

Our campsite at the Escalante Petrified Forest State Park
Wide Hollow Reservoir at just after sunrise
We enjoyed our first day hiking and relaxing at our campsite. We took a hike on the Petrified Forest trail near the campground. The trail took us up about 400 feet to the top of a plateau to a Petrified Forest of trees that dated back about 150 million years ago. These crystalized trees were preserved by a process related to volcanic activity in this area just after the dinosaurs disappeared. 

Barbara on the trail to the Petrified Forest, The Wide Hollow Reservoir is in the background

Petrified Log shining in the late spring sun
The view of the campground from high up on the trail
Flower blooming in the warm spring sun next to a petrified log
The Grand Staircase at Escalante National Monument has a varied landscape as it begins in the Dixie National Forest high up at about 9,000 feet gradually descending into the the Colorado River basin. The landscape here transitions from white rock to red rock canyons and multiple geological formations that leave you with a sense of wonder that nature can be so diversified in a way that defies the imagination.

The CCC bridge on the Hell's Backbone road in the Dixie National Forest

The view from the CCC bridge on the Hell's Backbone Road

The amazing beauty and vistas of Escalante National Monument 
We were so amazed at the incredible beauty that makes this area of Utah so special. The Burr trail road out of Boulder, Utah provides visitors a great opportunity to see how special this area is and how it must be preserved for our children's children.

White checkerboard Mesa at the beginning of Burr trail road

A red sandstone arch in Gulch area of the Burr Trail Road

The Gulch area of the Burr Trail Road 

Barbara in front of a slot canyon just off the Burr Trail Road

Happy as I can be, Life is good

View of the steep walls in the slot canyon 
Our stay in the Escalante National Monument area convinced us that this area should always be preserved and never exploited for it's natural resources. Our country has amazing public lands It is up to us to protect these special places and make our voices heard. If we do not they will disappear and just be a memory.